We provide service regarding Accounting & consultancy in Belgium

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Setup your Business in Belgium

    This is an annual tax on property owners (not tenants), based on ownership as at 1 January of each year. The amount is a percentage of the revenue cadastral/kadastraalinkomen (estimated annual rental) and is levied by each region. In Flanders it is around 2.5 percent, and in Wallonia and Brussels around 1.25 percent.

    The information given here provides a general overview only, and you should always get professional advice from a Belgian financial professional regarding your individual tax situation in Belgium.

    Our services in Belgium

    We provide following services in Belgium through our affiliates, which are fully authorised agent of Belgium revenue authority known as “Service Public Fédéral Finances”:

    Business start-up advice
    Company formation
    Online accounting
    Bookkeeping and bank reconciliations
    Fully outsourced accounts department
    Payroll support or fully outsourced payroll managed by us
    VAT – Taxe sur la ValeurAjoutée (TVA)
    Accounts preparations
    Management accounts
    Tax returns
    Transactional tax
    Double taxations reliefs
    Taxation advice for individuals
    Specialist corporation tax services
    Property and land transactions planning
    Business development and consultancy
    Compliance services with local tax authorities

    Taxes & Vat in Belgium:

    In Belgium, VAT is called Taxe sur la ValeurAjoutée (TVA) or Belasting over de ToegevoegdeWaarde (BTW). It is payable on most goods and services at a rate of 21 percent. VAT on food in restaurants and social housing is at 12 percent. Food, water, books and medicines are set at 6 percent and some daily and weekly publications and recycled goods are rated at zero percent.

    Business taxation
    The basic rate of business taxation is 33 percent. To find out more about taxation for businesses and the self-employed in Belgium, read our guide to taxation, social and other charges for the self-employed in Belgium.

    Property tax –Précompteimmobilier/Onroerendevoorheffing (PI/OV)

    This is an annual tax on property owners (not tenants), based on ownership as at 1 January of each year. The amount is a percentage of the revenue cadastral/kadastraalinkomen (estimated annual rental) and is levied by each region. In Flanders it is around 2.5 percent, and in Wallonia and Brussels around 1.25 percent.

    Municipal taxes

    Municipal taxes for TV, rubbish, water, etc. are levied by the regions/provinces and municipalities (communes/gemeenten) at rates of up to 9 percent, calculated on the amount of income tax you pay.

    Non-residents don’t pay municipal tax but pay instead a federal tax at a flat rate of 7 percent on income tax.

    Inheritance, capital gains and gift tax
    Inheritance tax is payable on the total value of the estate of a person settled in Belgium, or any property owned in Belgium if they are not settled there. Heirs pay tax on their share. Those working for the EU, NATO or similar organisations are exempt.

    Capital gains tax is payable on the difference between the original purchase price and the final sale price on property and land sales. Gift tax is a tax on financial gifts to relatives.

    Double taxation relief:
    There is a risk that your income may be taxed twice if two countries have the right to tax your income because, for instance:

    You live in one EU country but work in another (cross-border commuter)
    You are posted abroad for a short assignment
    You are living and looking for work abroad and have transferred unemployment benefits from your home country
    You have retired to one country and receive a pension from another
    In these situations, while you will always be subject to the tax rules of your country of residence, you may also have to pay taxes in the other country.

    Fortunately, however, most countries have double tax agreements. These agreements usually spare you from double taxation:

    Under many bilateral tax agreements, the amount of tax you paid in the country where you work will be offset against the tax you owe in your country of residence
    In other cases, the income earned in the country where you work might be taxable only in that country and exempt from tax in your country of residence

    You should note that the tax rates in the two countries involved will most likely be different. If the tax rate in the country where you work is higher, that is the final rate you will pay – even if the tax paid in that country is offset against the tax due in your country of residence, or if your country of residence exempts you from any further tax.

    In order to claim relief from double taxation you may need to prove where you are resident and that you have already paid taxes on your income. Check with the tax authorities what proof and which documents you need to submit.